Kunming College of Eastern Language and Culture

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Or even cash incentives? I know of a small charity that provides parents with such. Evidence exists that this works.
Fact is, there are sometimes small hidden costs in the 'free' elementary and middle school state education, which seem trivial unless you're really poor. Some people are really poor.

How about this: tax breaks to those who keep their kids in school? Seems to me this might interest those with no cash more than requirements to pay for schools that, for one reason or another, their kids are not attending.

Quite simply, Janjals perception and solution of the issue is guided, factually based and positive, whilst Dazzer's is negative and pointless (again). Please stop wasting e-ink. Whoever came up with your solution of 1%ers paying more tax resembles something in this winter weather which occasionally floats down from the clouds....bbrrrr!

Alright, if you go that way then everything is assuming. Assumptions is what made our ancestors come down from trees and cross a river and a mountain range. You assume quite a bit already when you go to sleep at night.

I am not assuming anything that didn't happen already. China already had a peasant revolution that was supposed to bring prosperity to all.

I am not asking for another revolution, but I am asking for that same spark. I do admit assuming that the Chinese state can contain such spark better this time.

assumption1- even 1% taxation of the little they have would have big impact on their awareness of their rights and privileges.
assumtion2 - it would tell them that they pay for even the limited resources they get, and it would be in their best interest to actually use them.
assumti9on3 – there is a connection between education and But there is psychological barrier to accept such "gifts". "" assumes they see staturtory education as gift

assumption4 as to reasons why they work in the big city. Some rather leave their children behind and go earn the money themselves from coast. Some rather die quietly in their homes than early enough access even the limited medical services that they are entitled to.''
assumption 5. this is achievable. The poor themselves must be activated to ask and accept those services.

@alienew: "it is precisely money that the poor do not have."

And that is why even 1% taxation of the little they have would have big impact on their awareness of their rights and privileges. In context of OP, it would tell them that they pay for even the limited resources they get, and it would be in their best interest to actually use them.

For example in mountains in Changning, Baoshan, the local government subsidizes roomy tents to families who live in dangerous mudbrick houses or need more space for children but are not financially capable to build bigger and better houses.

But there is psychological barrier to accept such "gifts".

Some go to great lengths to find, borrow and steal the money rather that accept services for free. Some rather leave their children behind and go earn the money themselves from coast. Some rather die quietly in their homes than early enough access even the limited medical services that they are entitled to.

I have personally witnessed all of that within last year.

The state is going to increase financial reach to rural regions in coming years, and as Vicar hinted, trusting the reach-out to public service providers will only go half way. The poor themselves must be activated to ask and accept those services.