Wonders Of Yunnan Travel

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The Haba-Bendiwan Route shown on the map passes through the mining area. It will be covered in a future article in the series. In the past I was concerned about hiking the area due to the use of explosives. In 2018 while in Bendiwan I heard blasts up above and saw dust clouds rising in the air. As of 2019, the mine is reported to be shut down permanently after fifty years in operation. The Haba Snow Mountain Provincial Nature Preserve took credit for shutting it down, due to environmental concerns, which I learned about from a Preserve employee. I saw no mine workers anywhere while passing through. You don't want to drink from any streams in the area. They are polluted by mine tailings and take on a milky coloration. Water pipes high on the mountain bring down clean water to villages in the gorge. I passed such pipes at 3,900 meters and they ran up the slope even higher than that.

Thanks for sharing.
Question: do these trails pass through the tungsten mines which are located high up on the slopes of Mt Haba above Tiger Leaping Gorge? I always wondered if those tungsten mine areas are off-limits to hikers? How many miners are actually up there, and will they try to kick out hikers if they see them?

Someone should let CNN know, Frank Losonsky died at age 99 earlier this year in February. Apparently he was the last remaining Flying Tiger.

A lengthy piece on Flying Tigers just published on CNN. Also a short video showcasing one of the last three living volunteer pilots, a 96-year old Losonsky. Cool pictures of the cool P-40 fighter planes in air are featured too.

The article even briefly mentioned Kunming...

"Chennault expressed his disappointment at his group's first combat mission against Japanese bombers attacking the AVG base in Kunming, China, on December 20, 1941. He thought the pilots lost their discipline in the excitement of combat."

Read it here:

edition.cnn.com/[...]