Tenwest Mandarin School

User profile: Tom69

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  • RegisteredNovember 17, 2010
  • RegionChina
  • VerifiedNo
  • RegisteredNovember 17, 2010

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Forums > Travel Yunnan > malipao/vietnam border crossing open but..........

OK so that website does seem to confirm foreigners can cross. Finally something. In general, it should be in English because sometimes Chinese websites claim a border is open but fail to mention it's only for Chinese and citizens of the neighboring country. This link is an exception to that.

Chinese cars can't enter Vietnam, no wonder you were forced to drive to Hekou via Chinese territory. This means you would have had to park your car at the border and enter Vietnam on foot.

Please also state your nationality. By the sounds of it you are probably from one of the 4 Scandinavian countries that can enter Vietnam visa-free for 15 days.

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Forums > Travel Yunnan > malipao/vietnam border crossing open but..........

@Napoleon, then what's the point of this thread? Why don't you hop on a bus and go there yourself? I don't have time to waste on these kinds of things, nor do most other people. Anyway, I can answer this question now. The Malipo border is not open unless someone can post something to prove otherwise.

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Forums > Travel Yunnan > malipao/vietnam border crossing open but..........

I probably got the UK and US mixed up regarding the Vietnam visa exemption. I've checked and indeed the US isn't included, though the UK is. Anyway, that wasn't the point of this thread. Question is still, is Malipo useable for crossing into Vietnam/China by foreigners?

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Forums > Living in Kunming > Chinese driver's licence renewal

Could you kindly let me know whether you've started the renewal process and your circumstances.

1) visa type. Do they care what visa you are on?
2) do you have to do any more tests?
3) costs?
4) how far in advance of expiry can you extend? 3 months? 6 months?
5) how long after the expiration of the licence can you extend? 3 months? 6 months?
6) is the new licence a plastic card, or a laminated piece of paper as previously?

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Globalism is relevant here, because it's the dominant ideology that is being force fed down our throats, at least in the west for the past few decades. Just because the media, popular culture and western governments like to force us to accept that crap doesn't mean it should be considered the 'norm' or 'good', which is why I object to people dissing nationalism, without being objective by also criticizing the left's tactics because to me it is a blatant double standard. You would have made a better point if you had correctly pointed out "ultra-nationalism" as being the problem here, which is quite prevalent amongst a significant proportion of the Chinese population and explains the negative reactions of many Chinese netizens to this student's speech.

From the responses here, I can see many GoKunming posters still have their wits about them, but I can guarantee you back in the west you have to assume everyone is a liberal when they only attack speech that is contrary to their worldview.

This student's speech was a sort of subtle way of dissing her country. While it may be a bit excessive for her countrymen to criticize her for correctly pointing out that China has air pollution problems (which would suggest that a Chinese person can't even slightly criticize their homeland), I think what really got Chinese netizens fuming is the claim that there is complete freedom of speech and freedom in general in America but none in China, which is a typical tactic employed by western propagandists trying to make China look bad. I call complete bull on that. You have freedom of speech in America that is protected by the 1st amendment of the constitution, but in practice, there are many places (such as most universities) or situations where anything other than left-wing, liberal, SJW speech is not welcome. Anything of a conservative or libertarian nature is criticized, ridiculed, taken out of context, dismissed etc. and to pretend there's complete freedom of speech in America in 2017 when you have both active and passive censorship taking place is ludicrous. It's also not true that there is absolutely no freedom of speech in China. Yes there are a few things you have to be very careful talking about - but I find it's possible to talk about the vast majority of topics with Chinese people, many of which I would only carefully raise with a westerner or even avoid altogether unless I knew said individual very well. The other thing is when I talk to Chinese people about these topics, sometimes they even bring them up themselves, nobody gets offended, but they relish in the lively discussion.

Another example are publications like The Shanghaiist, the Global Times etc. all allow unfiltered comments of any type to fill their comments sections - some newspapers in the States like the NY Times will delete unfavorable ones. Let's not forget Facebook, or should I say "censorbook", which is increasingly employing the same kind of tactics. Hmm. Double standard much?

Yes, something like that but I think you've misinterpreted my point. I was trying to say that extreme viewpoints on either side of the spectrum are problematic as evidenced by my examples contrasting two ideological opposites that have resulted in largely the same outcomes (violence, rioting, property damage, vandalism etc.) It's always best to reach a conclusion somewhere in the middle by considering both angles to a story. Being perpetually offended by playing the victim card is stupid, but so too is deliberately antagonizing someone or something else.

So does "internationalism" or "globalism", Alien. It produces the insanity that we have been seeing in many parts of the west, the USA in particular of screaming leftists who have become so insane as to threaten the life of the US president yet strangely haven't been arrested for attempted murder. Even the media takes part, in fact the media is a huge part of the problem and yes, it's completely biased and much of their reporting is fake, distorted inconsistent with the facts or omits the truth.

The Chinese form of nationalism that you are referring to may however also be somewhat exaggerated for effect and yes, ultra-nationalism, as many Chinese practice when there is a stir-up of nationalist sentiment in response to a "threat", particularly from the arch-nemisis nation of Japan or Vietnam, the Philippines etc. can get out of hand and sometimes results in innocent lives being lost when a riot starts, in addition to massive property destruction. The anti-Japanese riots of a few years ago, when Japanese cars, probably made in China and driven by Chinese citizens were destroyed is one example. Similarly, an anti-China protest last year I think in Vietnam resulted in a couple of lives lost and a large amount of property destruction at a Taiwanese owned factory. No mainland Chinese people owned any of the assets that were targeted nor were they amongst the victims of the rioting.

So perhaps the point I'd like to make is the best response is the middle ground.

True, the Chinese do drive relatively slowly and I find it's only in the cities, mainly bigger cities where drivers can be quite aggressive. Out of the highways it's a doodle though, especially compared to Thailand where you generally have higher traffic volumes and drivers who drive at much higher speeds.

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