GoKunming Forums

MA studies in China - corruption?

Serrure (132 posts) • 0

I've heard some rumours concerning getting a MA diploma in China.

1. Students have to give red envelopes to pass exams, conduct research and of course to graduate.
2. Students have to sometimes invite teachers to expensive restaurants.
3. Before the start of studies students should introduce themselves to teachers and give them some gifts.
4. If there is a foreigner in class there will be at least one English speaking Chinese who works for the party and spies on this foreigner.
Are any of these true or just stupid stereotypes?

mmkunmingteacher (561 posts) • 0

Those are, for the most part, not true. Chinese culture in general, of course, include giving gifts and respecting teachers. But it is not that it is "necessary" to pass. Also, the days of sending spies to spy on foreigners are over. If the government wants to spy on you, they will do it electronically, but I doubt they really care these days. China is changing, and I do not think any of this is real.

Alien (3819 posts) • 0

Surveillance society is what we have, globally, but I don't think anybody makes a big point to pick out MA students in in China, unless maybe it's the NSA. Ask Snowden.

Serrure (132 posts) • 0

I've heard from one foreigner that he cannot graduate cause he doesn't have enough money to afford red envelopes for his teachers. I've been wondering if someone was in a similar situation.

Alien (3819 posts) • 0

If that's true, the fooker should be named and hammered - there's more than enough bs in academia already
Saw a tv show the other night - professor at Harvard said now, thanks to internet fixations on soundbites, students actually groan when he announces that their first homework assignment is A WHOLE BOOK! Nobody want to go deep enough into anything to learn to analyze information anymore - at Harvard!
Information swamp, desert of thought.

mmkunmingteacher (561 posts) • 0

Serrure, how does he know that money is the reason he cannot graduate?

Serrure (132 posts) • 0

I don't want to shame anyone here. The point is I was surprised to hear about this and wanted to ask if corruption is common at Chinese universities. In my country giving presents (AFTER graduation "thank you" flowers or chocolate are okay) and money to teachers can get a student expelled and a teacher to loose his job. Corruption's simply a crime.

That's my point - I want to earn my degree not buy it.

mmkunmingteacher (561 posts) • 0

Serrure, I seriously doubt any of that is true. No Chinese professor would outright say that he wanted money for graduation. If he thinks they are implying it, then maybe he can turn the tables by telling them, "I am very sorry and embarrassed, Professor, that I cannot give a hongboa for my graduation."

This will cause the Professor to lose face if he admits it. Most Chinese would then feel forced to pass him rather than lose face.

atwillden (109 posts) • 0

The red envelope thing is true, but somewhat misunderstood. To defend a masters or doctoral level degree, you generally have to arrange presentations to a committee of other experts or researchers and pay them for their time in listening to you. The higher the level, the more you pay for their expertise. This is pretty standard in certain businesses and fields of study, as people often get paid for attending meetings directly by the meeting organizer.

Serrure (132 posts) • 0

Huh, so apart from tuition I have to pay extra to get a diploma. And the sum depends on teachers' whim and it's still a kind of bribe. Well, I have to start saving money for red envelopes then.

Related forum threads

Login to post