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Kunming air quality ranks number two among Chinese cities

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Despite the ubiquitous demolition and construction throughout Kunming, the city's air quality has improved dramatically in the last three years, according to government meteorological data.

Xinhua is reporting that Kunming's four urban districts recorded 90 days of 'excellent' air quality in the first 233 days of this year, surpassing the previous year-long record of 88 days set last year. The remaining 143 days of non-excellent air quality were rated 'good'.

Kunming recorded only 18 days of excellent air quality in all of 2006 and 52 in 2007.

Haikou, capital of the island province of Hainan, was the only major Chinese city with higher air quality than Kunming, Xinhua reported.

Although in some areas it is stricter than its US counterpart, China's air quality index draws criticism for leaving out ozone and 2.5 particulate matter – fine airborne particles linked to lung damage and thought by some scientists to be able to seep into the bloodstream.

Additionally, air quality is determined by averaging the results of stations throughout a city, allowing for the air in some areas of a city to be dirtier than the official rating given to that day's air for the city as a whole.

The Kunming municipal government's air quality goals for this year are for every day's air quality to meet 'excellent' or 'good' standards and for the city to record more than 100 days of excellent air quality.

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Comments

Wow.
I mean it's quite an accomplishment, but to my eyes over the years it seems to have gotten worse rather than better.
What with hundreds of thousands of newer cars over the years, how does this happen? Does that fall under this 2.5 particulate matter?

Did they happen to mention which city had the overall worst air quality in China?

I believe Linfen in Shanxi Province traditionally has the worst air quality of any city in China, and thus the world.

This article gives no information on how it is possible that KM's air quality would improve so dramatically while construction, demolition and automobile use have all increased.

Thanks Doubting Thomas, that was an unintentional omission on my part.

The source article said different government departments closed power stations, cement factories and the like which didn't meet environmental standards, as well as enterprises which discharged dust or sulfur dioxide.

Chris

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