GoKunming

Forums

Failed international HS

cloudtrapezer (696 posts) • -1

Everyone who gets into a top school is a straight A student. But there are many more qualified applicants than places. When forced to choose the schools look at what else a student "brings to the table." So if your family is rich and/or influential you have a far better chance.

Geezer (1891 posts) • 0

@cloud: Aside from your logically false statement and using the subjective modifier "qualified," you slide right into the privilege argument. My son had a dream of going to MIT and graduated high school one class short of straight A's.

He got a full scholarship to Tufts University just four miles away from MIT. As a engineering student, the majority of his engineering classes were actually at MIT.

It seems that, as his mother is Vietnamese, he chose to identify as Asian. As an Asian, he wasn't qualified to be a MIT student. He learned from his MIT classmates that if he had identified as White he would have gotten into MIT.

A good friend, we served together and later worked together, in Vietnam, has a daughter who wanted to go to medical school. My friend, who is Black, also married a Vietnamese. Their daughter also identified as Asian and despite graduating at the top of her high school class, failed to gain entry to medical school.

These two "kids" now in their 50s, went on to successful careers despite not bringing "to the table" what top schools wanted when they were not chosen.

@Napoleon is right. For Chinese students the path to a US, or UK, education is costly with agents, fees, business agreements and money much more important than grades.

dolphin (469 posts) • +1

There has been an army of westerners living and teaching here for decades.

If these resources were better managed and utilized, these over-priced "international schools" would not need to exist and neither would the need to go study abroad at outrageous prices.

Maybe China is hoping that the army of Chinese nationals studying abroad will come back and help improve things here, but many of them do not want to come back, as far as I know.

cloudtrapezer (696 posts) • 0

@ geez. Maybe I wasn't clear. Many more people apply to top universities than there are places. Almost all of them are academically qualified by objective, not subjective, standards e.g. straight As etc. I was told by a senior academic that in deciding who gets in the schools look at what else the student can bring to the table.. e.g. powerful well connected and/or wealthy families. I thought that was quite an admission.

michael2015 (613 posts) • -2

Apparently, there aren't enough long-term foreign English teachers with the business savvy and desire to buy out this bankrupt high school. It's really a shame to see all that infrastructure go to waste.

Napoleon (1176 posts) • +1

If you wanted an international school you would just buy the license and start again. If you're buying the school you'd have to settle all the debts for unpaid wages and lost tuition fees, plus whatever else they racked up. In the current climate I think it's far from a safe investment hence why it went bankrupt before someone was willing to take a punt.

michael2015 (613 posts) • -2

It's the CAPEX assets that should be available for free from the current property owner - who's probably looking for a new tenant.

As for the school license - of course a clean unencumbered license is mandatory.

But...the point is moot if nobody wants the asset.

tigertiger (5000 posts) • +1

If you cannot get a license the point is moot. Being a long term teacher with business savvy is not enough to get one. It is a lot more complicated that you think.
If there are outstanding liabilities the point is moot.
If the business case in that location, and political environment does not stack up, the point is moot.

Geezer (1891 posts) • +1

Trying to take over a school when someone has taken cash, plus whatever, is risky. I suspect there will be an endless parade of people trying to collect money.

Login to post Register to post